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Post-operative hand therapy exercises and instructions to help you following carpal tunnel decompression surgery.

This video demonstrates how to remove a hand or wrist cast yourself at home. Only do so if your cast has been made from SoftCast, and you have instructed to do so by your treating healthcare professional. During the UK Covid-19 pandemic of 2020, we are minimising hospital visits to avoid potential exposure to the coronavirus.

Official guidance on using a LimbO device to protect your plaster cast or splint from getting wet (e.g. when taking a shower or bathing).

BBC Cov & Warwick soundbite on Sunday hand surgery.mp3

Audio soundbite from an BBC Radio Coventry & Warwickshire interview with Mr Andy Mahon on Sunday 3 March 2019 regarding our seven day service.

We are also very grateful to Hand Therapy department at South Tees Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, who have shared their excellent rehabilitation videos. Please read the explanations carefully to know which exercises are suitable for your particular condition. Information on this site is intended to be used in conjunction with guidance from the health professional overseeing your care. If you experience persistent pain or discomfort, you should stop the exercises and contact either hand therapy (02476 966013) or our specialist hand nurse (02476 965072).

Finger tendon gliding exercises

This exercise is designed to move the 3 joints in the fingers and encourage gliding of the finger tendons. Always start with your elbow on the table, hand in the air and your wrist straight. Actively move the fingers as far as you are able, then return to the start position and repeat.

Finger tendon gliding and blocking exercises

This exercise also encourages gliding of the finger tendons but works finger joints individually. Actively bend and straighten the joints with as much force as you are able , then return to the start position and repeat.

Thumb active range of movement exercises

This exercise is designed to move the all joints in the thumb and encourage gliding of the tendons. Take each joint to the maximum movement you can and return to the starting position.

Wrist range of movement exercises

These exercises are particularly useful if your wrist has been immobilised in a plaster cast or splint for a long period of time, and will allow you to work on the 6 directions of wrist range of movement. You will need to change the position of your wrist and hand on the table as per the video instructions. Take each joint to the maximum movement you can and return to the starting position.

Exercises following metacarpal fracture

Following a metacarpal fracture it is important to follow these exercises to ensure you recover your range of movement. Start with hand on a table with your wrist and fingers fully straight. If you find the exercises too painful,consider exercising after you have taken pain relief.

The mallet finger splint

If you have been told you have a "mallet injury", this video will show you how to remove and reapply your splint safely to enable you wash your finger and to care for your skin. It is important not to let your finger 'droop'. It will take 6 weeks for a bone and 8 weeks for a tendon injury to heal. You will need to keep the splint on all the time during the day and the night.

Grip and pinch exercises

These exercises are to work on grip and pinch using a gel ball, and are also useful for people with basal thumb arthritis in conjunction with our soft thumb-wrap ("Be-cool") splints. If you do not have a ball a rolled up pair of socks, or a sponge can be used.


Flexor tendon repair - early stage rehabilitation

Do not remove your splint to perform these exercises. Loosen the straps as you have been shown. Each exercise should be performed slowly and carefully taking the fingers as far as they can go each repetition.


Extensor tendon repair - early stage rehabilitation

Do not remove your splint to perform these exercises. Loosen the straps as you have been shown.

Each exercise should be performed slowly and carefully taking the fingers as far as they can go each repetition.